Words from my reading

Another Wednesday, another set of new words from WordLily:

netsuke, n An ornamental button or figure of ivory, wood, etc., once used to attach a purse or other article to a kimono sash
page 179, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘It’d odd, you know: I never knew what interested him until someone at his funeral, one of the pallbearers, chanced to remark that his passion had been netsuke.'”
Note: The definition found in the text itself: “a small Japanese carving in ivory.”

philately, n The collection and study of postage stamps, postmarks, stamped envelopes, etc.
page 205, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘That, perhaps, will forever remain one of the great mysteries of philately.'”
I found this form interesting because it ends with -ly but it’s not an adverb.

gasper, n British slang for a cheap cigarette
page 208, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘Bob Stanley, who had come with Bony, was openly smoking a gasper and nobody seemed to mind.'”

sou, n Any of several former French coins, especially one equal to five centimes
page 221, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘I have nothing left to invest in the place, not a sou.'”

gibbet, n A gallows; a structure like a gallows, from which bodies of criminals already executed were hung and exposed to public scorn
page 234, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“It was this I had mistaken for corpse and gibbet.”
Note: This word is also a verb: To execute by hanging; to hang on a gibbet; to expose to public scorn.

grampus, n A playful black and white dolphin; killer whale
page 243, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘Don’t come near me,’ Feely said as I groped my way to the far end of the table, snuffling like a grampus.”

hesternal, adj Pertaining to yesterday (hestern is Latin for yesterday)
page 244, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘She is stuck in her “enervating slumbers, from the hesternal dissipation or debauch,”‘ Daffy said.”
Note: The definition found in the text itself: “pertaining to yesterday.”

tumulus, n An artificial mound, especially an ancient burial mound, barrow
page 272, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“Rook’s End was tucked into the folds of a cozy bed formed by Squires Hill and the Jack O’Lantern, the latter a curious outcropping of the landscape which, from a distance, appeared to be an Iron Age tumulus but, upon approach, proved to be substantially larger and shaped like a skull.”

dekko, n British colloquialism for a look, glance
page 358, Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley
“‘All right,’ he said at last, ‘let’s have a dekko.'”

Other posts with words from this book: Part 1, Part 2

More great words on my Words from my reading page.

Review of book cited here:
The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley

What new words have you discovered lately?

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10 responses to “Words from my reading

  1. As I collect stamps, I know philately very well.

    Dekko has been derived from Hindi.

    Wondrous Words Wednesdays

  2. Gibbet is the only one I’ve even heard of, but I couldn’t have defined it. Nice list.

  3. It looks like I’ll have to keep a dictionary handy if I ever read that book.

  4. I actually own a netsuke carving; it’s a little crouching guy with a sack full of demons on his back. If I can get a decent picture of him, I’ll post it sometime soon.

  5. I’ve not heard any of these words before. This must be a great book if you are expanding your vocaulary so much through reading it.

  6. I really like dekko. I’m going to use it in conversation this week. I’m very anxious to read this book (Sweetness) after reading all your words.

  7. wow. You have a great list of words!

  8. Pingback: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie « Care's Online Book Club

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