Words from my reading

A few more fun words from A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman this week, with special thanks to the author, Ru Freeman, for her help defining a few of these words:

Vathu-suddha at a shrine at the Temple of The Tooth, in Kandy, Sri Lanka, one of the most sacred shrines in Sri Lanka

Vathu-suddha at a shrine at the Temple of The Tooth, in Kandy, Sri Lanka, one of the most sacred shrines in Sri Lanka

vathu-suddha, n A small leaved white flower, literally: “flower that brightens a garden.”
page 5, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“Rings of white vathu-suddha studded here and there with small-petaled yolk yellow araliya, her favorite flower.”

palams, pl n Iced popsicles
page 19, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“One day they were picking flowers and eating ice palams out of green and white striped pyramid-shaped boxes, pushing the sweet bars out with their fingers no the one side, groping for them on the other with their wet tongues — she, Thara, the Boy, and Gehan — and the next it was done.”

nilamé, n Official dignitary, usually of royal ancestry
page 25, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“And standing next to Gehan that day, Latha had conjured up a wedding she had seen in a teledrama just that week and let it play in her head, substituting herself for the heroine and imagining the whole thing: herself decked in white, with those seven necklaces, including the gold jewelry around her forehead, jewels on her feet and over her arms, a bouquet of yellow araliya clasped in her hands, and Gehan dressed up like a nilamé, four-cornered turban and all, his thin body plumped up by the forty-eight yards of cotton cloth in his costume, a glittering silver knife tucked into his belt, and proud to extend his hand and watch the kapumahaththaya tie their little fingers together while the voices of nine little girls all dressed in white half saris washed over them with their blessings.”

ekel, n Reed-thin twig left behind when you strip a coconut frond of its greenery
page 100, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“Spaces where men are entirely absent or are only now stumbling out of thatched homes, waking to a clear day in an already-swept yard, the ekel marks still visible in the back-and-forth patterns women make each dawn, which are swept away by other feet before they have cooked breakfast, these mandalas that nobody notices unless they are created by monks in saffron robes.”

poruwa, n A beautifully decorated wooden platform on which the traditional Buddhist marriage ceremony takes place
page 111, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“How could she have pictured only feisty Thara and her childhood love ascending the jasmine-drenched poruwa from opposite sides, decked with smiles, all the colorful manipuri saris and smooth suits watching?”

manipuri, adj Of or relating to the people of Manipur, a state in NE India, on the Myanmar border
page 111, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“How could she have pictured only feisty Thara and her childhood love ascending the jasmine-drenched poruwa from opposite sides, decked with smiles, all the colorful manipuri saris and smooth suits watching?”

bombai mutai, n Candy floss
page 193, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“I stroke her hair and kiss her, breathing in the smell of Pears baby soap, coconut oil, and an assortment of sweet things: pineapple, bombai mutai, chocolate, and bread.”

sibilant, adj Having or making a hissing sound
page 227, A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman
“He even had a sound, a sibilant hiss, to go with it.”

More great words on my Words from my reading page.

Review of the book cited here:
A Disobedient Girl by Ru Freeman

What new words have you found lately?

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13 responses to “Words from my reading

  1. I love how you always find the flowers!

  2. After your comment, I investigated glossolalia further. My dictionary simply says tongue, but wiktionary says speaking in tongues, so you’re right! I thought it was used oddly in the sentence. Thanks for letting me know. Your words are great! The only one I knew was sibilant and that was from Harry Potter, I think. Thanks for participating!

  3. Thank you for your words. This is my first time participating in Wondrous Words. Your words do seem wondrous. I can’t take my eyes off the white flowers. They are so beautiful. Thank you for all of your words.

  4. I have a link to my word.

  5. The picture of the vathu-suddha is stunning. I’m getting a very good picture of this book from last week’s and this week’s words.

  6. Wow – the only one I was familiar with was sibilant. That book would require a lot of Googling!

    My words are here.

  7. Being an Indian, I do understand some of those words.

    Wondrous Words Wednesdays

  8. Great idea! I was wondering about these words while reading and toyed with a word post, but I never followed through. I’m glad you did!

  9. I am not familiar with any of your words. I do like the word sibilant.

    Here are my Wondrous Words

  10. Beautiful words and all of them completely new to me. The flowers truly look like they would brighten any garden.

  11. The words are a real mouth full… does having to look them up or reading over them do anything to the flow of the book for you?

    Some books I have read if it is too many words or phrases I am not familiar with I tend to give up on the book as it destroys the flow for me…. other times, unknown words just add to the beauty of the book.

What do you think? I'd love to know.

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