Words from my reading

A few fun words that were new to me this week:

mitre, n A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by church dignitaries
page 46, At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
“It would be out of place to describe here the wonderful sights he saw, for the music of them is in another key from that of this story, and I shall therefore only add from the account of this traveller, that the people there are so free and so just and so healthy, that every one of them has a crown like a king and mitre like a priest.

humble-bee, n Bumblebee
page 49, At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
“A creature like a great humble-bee or cockchafer flew past his face; but it could be neither, for there were no insects amongst the ice.”

cockchafer, n The popular name of a very common lamellicorn beetle of Europe, Melolontha vulgaris, also called May-beetle, May-bug, dor-beetle, and dor-bug; any one of various similar or related beetles
page 49, At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
“A creature like a great humble-bee or cockchafer flew past his face; but it could be neither, for there were no insects amongst the ice.”

parly, n I can’t find a definition for this.
page 60, At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald
“‘Well,’ said his friend, ‘all I say is — There’s a animal for you, as strong as a church; an’ll go like a train, leastways a parly,’ he added, correcting himself.”

More great words on my Words from my reading page.

I posted a few other words from At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald a couple weeks ago.

Book cited here:
At the Back of the North Wind by George MacDonald [my review]

What new words have you found lately?

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3 responses to “Words from my reading

  1. Interesting words! I was trying to infer a definition from the one you can’t find one for but I don’t think I can. I was still confused ha.

  2. I’m wondering if a parly is a lesser train.
    Great words! Thanks for posting.

  3. I would have guessed that mitre was the British way of spelling miter, and boy, would I have been wrong.

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